How to launch a Patreon page

How to launch a Patreon page

Join writer Sheelagh Caygill as she explores the obvious - and less obvious - trends and influences in communications, PR, and marketing. Also explored is writing and upping your game as a creator of prose. In this essential listen, she interviews senior comms pros, thought leaders, authors, and marketers to reveal insights you can incorporate into daily life. Sheelagh is an award-winning writer, journalist, podcaster, and poet based in Toronto, Canada.

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How to launch a Patreon page

Read part one of this series, Launching a Patreon Page? Here’s What to Do, before reading part two.

My main focus in the past week has been on:

  1. Working to increase my social media followers so I’ll have a larger audience when my Patreon page goes live
  2. Working and rewoking my page and tiers wording
  3. Continuing to read more about Patreon and what users say
  4. Following the Patreon subreddit, and participating if I have something to say
  5. Reading about the pros and cons of an intro video
  6. Getting feedback on my (preview) page

Increasing social media followers to support Patreon launch

A number of articles and podcasts underscore the importance of having a solid base of fans for your creative projec Equally, launching a new project and immediately creating a Patreon page isn’t recommended by some successful page owners. Even so, I am sure some have pulled this off.

Nevertheless, in the last week or so I’ve posted more frequently on Twitter, Instagram, and my site’s Facebook page. The best result has come from Instagram, where’s I’ve secured more followers and engagement.

Patreon page content and tiers

It’s clear that an engaging and funny (if appropriate) page with a message of gratitude is going to keep potential fans on your page when they first land. And, hopefully, they’ll be encouraged to become a patron.

I want patrons to feel valued and that they will benefit by supporting me. Eventually, I decide on what each tier will offer, and a total of five tiers (Pateon itself recommends no more than five tiers). Personally, I think seven or more tiers is too many. The reader will spend too much time reading and comparing, and could eventually just leave.

Patreon intro video

Everyone knows that videos can be more powerful than the written word. The site itself recommends having an intro video. After checking out a few, I can see how page owners can really connect with fans through this medium. You get to see the person and listen to their story, hopes for the page, and what their future plans are.

I don’t like being filmed and think I look really tired following a recent trip to Europe and long work hours. However, I’m going follow this advice and make myself create a short, homemade video. A good friend in Edmonton, Marvin Polis, offers free editing for the video when it’s ready. This pushes back my launch date, but that’s not really a big deal.

Checking out Patreon resources

As I mentioned last week, Patreon has plenty of resources for users, including Patreon U for new users, a blog, logos for your off-site promotion, and a newsletter. You can’t read all this material in a week, but what I have read so far has been useful.

Patreon subReddit

Patreon’s subReddit seems to have turned into a bit of a complaints board recently, with more people raising issues about accounts on hold, lack of response from from support, and other negatives. This concerns me at first, until I chat with another user who says he’s never had problems with his page. This is probably usual case of people being more prone to complaining than praising.

I use the subReddit to ask Patreon if any users outside the U.S. have had feedback from fans about the the fact that Patreon only accepts donations in U.S. dollars. Will a $5 U.S. tier will put some people off at first. North of the 49th parallel, $5 will be will be roughly $6.55 Canadian. Some Canadians can almost obsess about the exchange rate. However, Reditters who respond say they’ve never had an issue with fans being unhappy about exchange rates.

Get feedback on your page prior to launch

Two friends, including Fiona Fenwick, author of Stand Out and Step Up, read my preview page. I asked them to look for typos, clarity, flow, and overall presentation. Both sent me some really good feedback and suggestions.

Any questions about my Patreon preparation or live page? Get in touch via the contact form and I’ll get back to you.

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