Communicate Influence http://communicateinfluence.com The Magazine for People in Marketing, Journalism, Communications Thu, 22 Jun 2017 17:43:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Social media for start-ups on a budget – part one http://communicateinfluence.com/social-media-for-start-ups-on-a-budget-part-one/ http://communicateinfluence.com/social-media-for-start-ups-on-a-budget-part-one/#respond Wed, 21 Jun 2017 22:59:41 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1060 Start-ups have so much to take care of in the first months of business. Where does social media fit? Does it require immediate attention, or should it wait until the fundamentals are in place and the business is on sound footing? We speak to two social media consultants to give readers valuable advice and actionable tips […]

The post Social media for start-ups on a budget – part one appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
content marketing
Ivana Taylor

Start-ups have so much to take care of in the first months of business. Where does social media fit? Does it require immediate attention, or should it wait until the fundamentals are in place and the business is on sound footing?

We speak to two social media consultants to give readers valuable advice and actionable tips on optimizing use of social media. These interviews are aimed primarily at start-ups, but any organization will find something of value in them.

The first is with Ivana Taylor, Small Business Influencer with DIY Marketers. In two weeks we’ll published Michael Manzur‘s answers to the very same questions. Michael is a Social Media Marketing Professional with Flood Me Social, in Florida, U.S.

Social media: All about relationships

Should businesses start using social media from day one, or is it best to wait until a business is up and running for a few months?
The short answer is YES! Social media is a human-to-human activity and any business will be more successful if they start building those relationships on a personal level. My tip is to create two social accounts; a branded account and a personal account. Make it a point to use both accounts to build engagement with your audience.

Almost all social media pros call for the development of a social media strategy. What are some of the key elements of a solid social media strategy for small start-ups?
The key to EVERY social media strategy is carefully select what your primary social platforms will be. The best platform for you will be where your customers are AND where you feel most comfortable. Also consider how many social profiles you will have; a personal profile, a business profile, a customer support profile. Also be sure to include guidelines for what you will post, how often, etc.

Don’t forget to treat social media as a top-of-the funnel-relationship building activity. Be sure to set your goals and how you will nurture those relationships to achieve them.

It’s tempting for new businesses to jump in and use every major social media platform. For companies with limited staff and time, this approach can soon overwhelm. How many channels should start-ups be using, and how should they select them?
You don’t have to be everywhere, but you do have to be engaged on the platforms that you choose. I typically recommend no more than three channels. Facebook should be one of them, as should Linkedin. After that, you can choose Instagram or Pinterest if you have a business where you have to see to experience via photos or videos.

Related to the question above, obviously businesses need to target their potential customers and discover where they hangout. What are some of the best simple and quick customer research methods to identify the best social media platforms for a business?
You can use Google Analytics to find out where most of your customers are. Also check where your competitors are playing. Then you can decide whether you want to be there or do you want to choose another platform where your competition isn’t as strong.

Selling, engagement, or brand recognition?

There’s an ongoing discussion about using social media to sell vs using social media to engage, develop brand presence, and then grow loyalty. What’s your take on this discussion? Is the best use of social media somewhere in the middle, such as creating dialogues and, for example, helping customers with purchase decisions?
Think of social media as a way to make friends and build relationships. It’s like real life – only more efficient. In the same way you wouldn’t try to sell someone the minute you opened your mouth, you shouldn’t sell someone the first time you engage with them on social. Use the power of building relationships from the comfort of your home to build relationships. Use social to help people, contribute to them, make them smile, solve a problem and the sales will follow.

Businesses sometimes fall into constant self-promotion with social media, partly because they’re not sure what they should be talking about or they lack ideas for content. This is a two-part question. 1) Where can businesses find relevant and interesting content to share? 2) How can businesses, including start-ups, develop engaging conversations so that their target audience becomes responsive?
Content is EVERYWHERE! Here’s a sneaky tip, re-share other people’s content! Another great tip is to visit sites like BuzzSumo.com, RightRelevance.com, use Feedly or try Zest.is as a tab in your Chrome browser. I like to take the first hour of my day; over coffee; and go through my news feeds and see what’s interesting that I can share. I schedule those out using Buffer. But mostly, I like to share other people’s content.

The first place to start with engagement is talking to people ABOUT the content they are sharing. I always advocate joining Tweet Chats in your area of interest. I actually have a calendar of the best Small Business Tweet Chats that I add to all the time. If you are on Linkedin, make it a point to click on articles you are interested in and leave a comment or question to the person who shared it.

The follow/unfollow dilemma

A high number of followers can mean that a brand or individual can be seen as influential. As such, there are some accounts, particularly on Twitter and Instagram, that will follow and then unfollow in an attempt to push their own numbers even higher. This can be off-putting for new account holders. Any thoughts on how businesses should handle or respond to this tactic?
Following and unfollowing isn’t as important as most people think. Focus on engagement and conversation. Most people don’t realize that you don’t have to have a follow relationship to have a conversation on Twitter. You can simply respond and mention that person and they will talk to you. I actually have close friends who aren’t following and I’m sure I have close friends who I don’t follow and yet we still talk on Twitter all the time.

What are the top three or four mistakes small businesses should avoid with social media?

The number one mistake I see is ignoring social media. Simply not having a profile. The next biggest mistake is having profiles, but not engaging with people. At the very least, have a personal profile on LinkedIn and Facebook. Stay in conversations and build relationships.

The next biggest problem I see is businesses pushing and selling on social media. Social media is a relationship platform. You wouldn’t say “hello” to someone and then ask them to marry you – so why would you push people to follow you, download something or watch a video. Have a conversation first.

Finally, I notice small businesses being businesses instead of people. This is why I recommend starting with a personal profile, engaging with people you know and simply helping people on social media; answer questions, give recommendations. Create an impression and a reputation for being helpful and friendly.

Let’s touch on metrics. What are they key things that businesses should be monitoring and measuring with social media. Do you recommend any tools – free or otherwise – they can use to extract useful, actionable information?
The number one thing businesses need to monitor is their mentions – conversations that are going on that mention their brand, their products and service. But don’t stop there. Watch and monitor all mentions of your product categories.

Consider monitoring phrases where people are seeking help and advice in your product or service area – then jump into the conversation and offer help. Don’t sell – offer help. Right now, my favorite monitoring tool is Brand24, it tracks mentions for keywords as well as brand names, hashtags and phrases. I love the reporting because it tells me when there is a “storm” or influx of mentions.

Small business marketing expert Ivana Taylor

Ivana Taylor is a publisher and influencer with DIY Marketers. She helps small businesses on a budget simplify marketing with the best tools, tips and strategies. Ivana is based in Cleveland, Ohio, and believes that most businesses should be doing less (but more focused) marketing. You can find Ivana on Linkedin and Twitter.

© Communicate Influence. Please see Communicate Influence’s Terms and Conditions for information on sharing, adapting or attributing content.

The post Social media for start-ups on a budget – part one appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/social-media-for-start-ups-on-a-budget-part-one/feed/ 0
How public relations practitioners can tackle some of the big, enduring issues http://communicateinfluence.com/how-public-relations-practitioners-can-tackle-some-of-the-big-enduring-issues/ http://communicateinfluence.com/how-public-relations-practitioners-can-tackle-some-of-the-big-enduring-issues/#respond Mon, 05 Jun 2017 02:12:05 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1052 Sarah Hall is one of the most successful PR pros in the North East of England. She is the managing director of Sarah Hall Consulting, a PR & marketing agency in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, U.K. Sarah founded the #FuturePRoof community, which kickstarted “the biggest conversation ever around the future of public relations.” Its ambition is to support […]

The post How public relations practitioners can tackle some of the big, enduring issues appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Sarah Hall is one of the most successful PR pros in the North East of England. She is the managing director of Sarah Hall Consulting, a PR & marketing agency in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, U.K.

Sarah founded the #FuturePRoof community, which kickstarted “the biggest conversation ever around the future of public relations.” Its ambition is to support managers of agencies and communications teams with best practice advice and guidance.

We talk to Sarah about some of the most pressing questions in public relations today. In our Q&A we touch on the perception management teams have of PR professionals, fake news, pay in equality and more.

PR threats and opportunties

Sarah, you were the driving force behind #FuturePRoof One and Two. What prompted you to create these publications and what do they offer readers?
While you’re right in that the initial concept started out as a book, #FuturePRoof is in fact a living, breathing community looking at all the issues facing public relations practitioners today, with a view to the horizon. We share regular thought pieces through the #FuturePRoof blog and there is a vibrant Facebook group and busy Twitter feed.

Its overall purpose is to underline PR’s role as a management discipline and motivate practitioners to secure the skillset they need to deliver at Boardroom level. #FuturePRoof looks at the threats and opportunities for public relations so we are well placed to capitalize and stop other disciplines from eating our lunch.

Its strength and success comes from the fact the content comes from some of the world’s best public relations specialists from the worlds of business and academia, who have all given their time and expertise free of charge to help others develop.

#FuturePRoof has always been a labour of love for me and it’s grown significantly. When I shared the spec for the first book, I had no idea that there would be such a voracious appetite for the themes and content, and that book two would be published less than 18 months later.

Feedback shows that although our target audiences are senior practitioners, it works for everyone, including students, because the topics are so wide-ranging and comprehensive.

Ultimately it’s a celebration of everything the industry has to offer and my belief is that it has taken off in part because the public relations profession really needed a cheerleader.

Reinforcing the role of PR

The issue of public relations and communications teams being viewed by management as delivery teams and not part of strategy and tactic development persists. What can practitioners and managers do to change this?
This is a big problem and will require a widespread education drive leading to culture change.

Research shows that brand reputation is what keeps the C-Suite up at night.

Reputation management is PR’s job. Our role is to help organisations find their place in society and build long-term relationships with the people that matter. The lifetime value of a customer is much greater than a one off purchase and that’s what we offer, as well as support to the wide marketing function.

Good public relations teams act as the eyes, ears and conscience of an organisation and work with it to maintain its legitimacy within communities. They help it navigate uncertainty, especially in times of acute change like we are currently experiencing.

If we are working with the management team on the organisational objectives and overall direction, and setting the wider strategy, it makes absolute sense to have public relations as the lead discipline that all others feed into and not the other way round.

This comes back down to the fundamental aim of #FuturePRoof – to reinforce the role of public relations as a management discipline and to ensure practitioners have the skills to operate at the top of their game. The call to action is to upskill.

This means developing financial, business management and consultancy skills and commanding the respect of management teams by speaking their language. If we demonstrate what the true value of public relations is, they’ll invest in it.

On a practical level, as a mentor to young PR practitioners, how do you advise individuals who find themselves in a role where the opportunity to give communications advice is denied them?
The creation of the Global Alliance’s competency framework, means that there is absolutely no excuse not to benchmark your skills against where you are in your career, whether that’s entry level, or you’re a mid / senior practitioner.

My advice is to gain the skillset that will allow you to operate strategically in the true sense of the word, whether that’s through the company or personally. You’ll approach work differently and people’s response to you will also change. This step change has revolutionized my agency and the type of contracts we work on.

If you’re employed by a company that ultimately places no value on public relations and won’t invest in your CPD, I’d recommend leaving. It’s demotivating, you’ll never achieve what you want to in your career and are likely to be locked into a tactical role that will limit your career prospects.

Exciting times in PR

In a post-Brexit and fake news world, the political landscape is unlike anything anyone imagined just a few years ago. Politics impacts corporate culture and business. What opportunities lie ahead for communications and public relations in this new world?
There has never been a more exciting time to work in public relations. We’re needed more than ever to make sense of the changes taking place and help businesses navigate the path ahead.

Take the U.K., which has now seen eight years of austerity. When times are hard, customers evaluate brands to a much greater extent in terms of what they get for their money. No one really cares in boom time.

This is when time and effort spent on relationship-building and engagement comes in invaluable; those companies who understand their customer’s pain points and help them find solutions win out.

Part of the public relations’ remit is to ask what the organisation’s purpose is outside of pure profit generation and to bring that to life. It’s a definite area of growth.

In terms of Brexit, we have a duty to lobby government on behalf of our employers and clients to make the right choices. We need to ensure our EU colleagues are protected and horizon scan to see what opportunities and partnerships are available. There will be work in this area for years to come.

Finally, fake news offer challenges but also a chance to reinforce our credentials in terms of ethical comms, holding power to account and building trust. No other discipline can do the latter as well as us.

Most of us have, at sometime or another, worked for an organization and not felt fully aligned to its values. Sometimes it doesn’t matter but this second decade of the 21st Century is different. We’ve witnessed immigration bans, the removal of transgender rights, and threats to the LGBT community. I’d like to ask a two-fold question on this. Firstly, what guidance do you give to young public relations professionals who are members of minority groups and want to have a successful career. Second, what advice do you give to brands, particularly when reputation is in question?
Diversity in public relations is poor but organisations like the Taylor Bennett Foundation and various industry bodies are working hard to address this. What is clear is that we need better careers guidance from early on and a greater number of role models at the top, because this makes a real difference.

My advice to young professionals would be to identify a mentor and ask for help and guidance. It can be a career game changer if you find someone who understands the issues faced and has overcome them.

Secondly brands need to understand their publics. Insight and engagement should tell you all you need to know – just add to this a good dose of common sense. If you’re not sure how to represent a certain audience group, get out there and ask them!

If you mess it up, be up front about it. Make sure you express regret, say what you’re doing about the issue, provide reassurance and remain accessible. Getting it wrong doesn’t necessarily mean game over – how McDonalds has handled the communications around its latest advert is a case in point.

Let’s talk about gender issues. Many more women than men are working in communications, yet men seem to make it to into most of the PR/Comms management positions. Why is change so slow, and what actions can practitioners take to make senior level practitioners more accessible to women?

This is a multi-faceted problem. Quite frankly the gender pay gap will only be ironed out once every organisation is forced to publish their pay scales. It’s a fact.

Here’s a piece I wrote for #FuturePRoof about parity in public relations. It’s worth a read for the ten steps every organisation can follow at the end. I’ve not much more to add to that.

Going forward, what are the key skills required to be a successful PR practitioner?
I’ll point to the Global Alliance’s competency framework again here. It’s a brilliant piece of work so I won’t try and reinvent the wheel.

Finally, looking to the future, where do you see public relations in five years from now?
If we grasp the nettle and develop our skillset so we can deliver public relations as a management discipline, I see it thriving.

Public relations professional Sarah Hall

Sarah is the holder of the U.K.’s Chartered Institute of Public Relations Sir Stephen Tallents medal 2014 for exceptional achievement in public relations practice. And she has established a reputation as a role model for ethics in PR, as well as a gender and equality advocate through her work with the Institute.

Sarah will be the CIPR’s President in 2018 and was the first public relations practitioner to become Chartered in the North East of England. This status that recognizes the highest standard of knowledge, expertise and ethical practice within the PR industry and is a benchmark of professional excellence and integrity.

You can find Sarah on Linkedin and Twitter.

The post How public relations practitioners can tackle some of the big, enduring issues appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/how-public-relations-practitioners-can-tackle-some-of-the-big-enduring-issues/feed/ 0
Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup, May 14, 2017 http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-may-14-2017/ http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-may-14-2017/#respond Sun, 14 May 2017 19:33:33 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1046 Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . . Marketing news You pay to acquire customers, and you need to provide outstanding service to retain them. Here’s why your marketing has a role to play […]

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup, May 14, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . .

Marketing news

You pay to acquire customers, and you need to provide outstanding service to retain them. Here’s why your marketing has a role to play customer service.
Does Your Marketing Mix Include Killer Customer Service? Here’s Why It Should – Forbes As a business owner, I understand how important it is to be mindful of where every dollar is spent, especially when it comes to marketing. What’s even more essential is understanding there are certain types of marketing that can and will help you grow …

Do you want to use influencer marketing in your mix? If so, avoid these mistakes.
5 Myths About Influencer Marketing – AdAge.com Influencer marketing is the most powerful tool in a marketer’s toolbox, but the term “influence” is widely misunderstood, said Team Epiphany founder and Managing Partner Coltrane Curtis at the One Club’s Creative Summit Thursday. “Influence is a force …

Thinking you should be more liberal with the truth to keep up with your competitors? Now probably isn’t the best time.
Rethinking Sales and Marketing in the ‘Post-Truth’ Era – Entrepreneur But, you have to wonder: Are these definitions talking about politics or sales and marketing? The reason I ask is that part of running any company entails communicating with your market and employees. In every one of those interactions. you’re called …

Are you ready to power your brand’s visual storytelling? You need a simple way to manage your photos and videos so you can get work done faster. As you race to keep up with the demand for visual content, Libris is a digital asset management platform that will be ready to be your pit crew.

Journalism news

Why Brooke Baldwin isn’t giving the phrase ‘fake news’ the time of day, and more . . .
CNN’s Brooke Baldwin Says Journalism Is Alive and Well in 2017 – Parade On Sunday, the Peabody Award finalist is adding something exciting to her plate as she heads to her alma mater, University of North Carolina, to address a commencement crowd of over 30,000. Read on as Baldwin discusses the state of journalism today and …

Local journalism has a key role to play in creating trust between readers and media outlets.
Meet a hack: press body champions local journalism in ‘trusted news’ campaign – PRWeek Speaking to ahead of the event, NMA CEO Lynne Anderson said Trusted News Day would showcase how “local journalism is the antidote to fake news on social media”. She said: “This is the culmination of the Fighting Fake News campaign – led by …HoldTheFrontPage.co.ukBath Chronicle

An interesting discussion on the use of iOS vs Android in journalism.
Is Android the future of mobile journalism? – Journalism.co.uk Mearns explained that Asia Pacific, the Middle East and Africa will have a much higher population of people under 30 by 2020 than Europe, according to statistics from Euromonitor International, leading the way for future mobile journalists to be on …

PR/Communications news

When PR gets in the way of the production of news.
Political journalists complain about level of PR control at Theresa May campaign events – Press Gazette understands that the system of pre-arranging which journalists get to ask questions of the Prime Minister is seen by Tory PR staff as a way of ensuring that a range of journalists from different titles get to ask questions. Tory insiders …

Marketers have long understood the value of good and effective PR. In the next five years, they are set to increase their spend in this area.
Marketers to Increase PR Spending Over Next 5 Years – New Study Says – Business Wire (press release) (blog) The Association of National Advertisers (ANA) and the USC Center for Public Relations at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism have released a new report that offers a candid look at how marketers plan to tackle public relations in the …

 

 

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup, May 14, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-may-14-2017/feed/ 0
‘Leave any attitude in the newsroom,’ says PR convert http://communicateinfluence.com/leave-your-attitude-in-the-newsroom-says-pr-convert/ http://communicateinfluence.com/leave-your-attitude-in-the-newsroom-says-pr-convert/#respond Wed, 10 May 2017 17:04:04 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1038 Steve Warburton worked as a journalist at The Mississauga News, The Edmonton Journal, and CBC Halifax, for almost 11 years before moving into PR/communications. He’s among one of the thousands of journos who said goodbye to news and stepped into the world of PR. Is the transition fairly easy, and what prompts reporters to make […]

The post ‘Leave any attitude in the newsroom,’ says PR convert appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
move from journalism to PR
Steve Warburton

Steve Warburton worked as a journalist at The Mississauga News, The Edmonton Journal, and CBC Halifax, for almost 11 years before moving into PR/communications. He’s among one of the thousands of journos who said goodbye to news and stepped into the world of PR.

Is the transition fairly easy, and what prompts reporters to make it in the first place?

We ask Steve these questions and a few more. If you’re a journalist thinking about making this leap (and we know many are, given the state of media outlets today), you’ll have a bit of insight into what this career change feels like and how to navigate any challenges, too.

If enjoy this interview and see our interviews with Claire Thorburn and Nick Mier, too.

What was it like moving from CBC Halifax as a reporter/producer to your first role in communications, which was Director of Communications with the Government of Nova Scotia? How did it feel at the time, and did you miss the fast-paced world of news? Did your office ever feel just a little bit too quiet?
To back up a bit, a year before I made that move, we had moved cross-country to Halifax. There were a couple of competing thoughts going through my head then. I had noticed, early in my journalism career, that older journalists were few and far between – and of those that were around, many had gone from sarcastic to cynical.

Also moving to a new part of the country where I was virtually unknown offered a clean slate. So it seemed like a good time to re-brand myself. I had a family to support and when I looked around the media landscape in Halifax, there weren’t many choices – and fewer good choices.

So before I moved, I had already started to change my own identity from journalist to communicator. Every job I had after, I have brought the best traits of serving the public, be factually correct and treat the Lieutenant Governor who I’ve wrote speeches for, the same as the waitress and shoemaker.

Another important point to mention I was so busy and almost overwhelmed that I didn’t have any time to miss journalism. In retrospect, I was really in the deep end – new province, new setting, new career and I had six staff to manage!

Developing connections in PR

What was it like suddenly being the one to be contacting reporters and pitching ideas or stories, or dealing with their requests for interviews or comments?
Hmm, it took a while to get use too. My wife was still at a newspaper, the Daily News, so I still had a foot in that world. As well, Halifax is one-degree of separation and I was playing summer softball in a reporters league so I knew many through that avenue too. I had no PR training so I used techniques like chit-chat to get comfortable.

Most journalists are driven by a big streak of curiosity and some – particularly in the broadcast world – are said to have pretty impressive egos. How do these qualities play in the world of communications?
Overall, the Maritimes isn’t a place for egos. Of course, like anywhere, there are a few big egos. Overall, though, I’d say there are fewer of them in communications.

You have a BA in Journalism, as well as a degree in history. In retrospect, how did your journalism studies help prepare you for the world of PR? Did you have skills that helped you with your comms work that maybe even students from PR schools lacked?
There are a few parts to answer that question. First, it turned out every course I took in first year university I’ve done as part of my career. Journalism, political science, business, English and history. I sometimes say: “I was millennial before it was invented.”

A few years into PR I wondered what I might have missed with journalism training and not a PR degree. I got appointed to Mount Saint Vincent University’s Professional Advisory Board for the PR program there. From the insights I picked up there, I felt comfortable I knew enough. I was also asked to teach PR at the community college here so I thought that was reassuring. My public speaking skills from journalism have definitely help.

Crisis management in media relations

Have your journalism skills equipped you with a niche in comms, such as media relations or crisis management?
Absolutely, I’ve managed dozens of crises so staying cool and focused on task was key. I covered cops and fire in Edmonton. I didn’t like it at the time. That was the hardest job I ever had, so in comparison, everything else has been easier.

I got so good at media relations; I earned good money offering seminars as a former reporter.

And the flip-side of the coin, you’re based in Halifax, Canada, where there are two schools producing journalism graduates. Presumable you’ve worked alongside some of them at some point in your PR career? Have you ever felt out of your depth, of that you had to study or read up on something pretty quickly to remain on equal footing?
Not only journalism grads but two PR schools as well. This place is crawling with communicators. Social Media comes to mind in terms of keeping pace. After my civil service career, I’ve been running my own PR company and have taught Social Media for Adults courses. I try not worry about what I don’t know.

What things do you wish you’d known before going into PR?
At this stage, not a lot. When I first started, I acted like a reporter for quite awhile and I think my staff liked it and didn’t like it. I had to learn to be more strategic and proactive, instead of being so reactive.

PR in government departments vs agencies

You’ve worked in in-house communications departments and for agencies, too. How would you describe the differences to a reporter thinking about a change?
Agencies are dog-eat-dog. Billable hours, lots of firing, but lots of fun if you make it that way. In-house government communications can be very busy depending on where you are located. I have been super busy and less so. Traditionally, in government, I was as busy as the deputy and other senior managers.

Are there any other tips you have for a reporter thinking about going into communications?
Have an open mind. Leave any attitude in your old newsroom.

Journalist and communicator Steve Warburton

Steve is currently Digital Content Co-ordinator with Nova Scotia Community College, Halifax. He has a BA in History from Huron Community University, London, Ont., and a Bachelor of Journalism from University of King’s College, Halifax. You can find Steve on Linkedin.

The post ‘Leave any attitude in the newsroom,’ says PR convert appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/leave-your-attitude-in-the-newsroom-says-pr-convert/feed/ 0
Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup May 6, 2017 http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-may-6-20171035-2/ http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-may-6-20171035-2/#respond Sat, 06 May 2017 19:10:12 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1035 Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . . Marketing news . . . How Hulu’s hit series The Handmaid’s Tale is spurring political commentary online: The Internet Is Using ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Memes to […]

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup May 6, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . .

Marketing news . . .

How Hulu’s hit series The Handmaid’s Tale is spurring political commentary online:
The Internet Is Using ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Memes to Voice Political Opinions (Here’s What Brands Can Learn From It) – Inc.com When it comes to marketing, it’s common knowledge that social media is a popular tool for reaching people. But few things go viral faster than a meme (a.k.a. pop culture references and short quips), proving it to be an effective way of reaching an …

While some marketers are hesitant about automation, this study shows that it can enhance trust.
Marketing Automation Can Help Build Trusted Relationships – Forbes It is human nature to trust people who we feel know and understand us. A study published in The Journal of Neuroscience may offer a clue as to why. The study involved an experiment where participants were given a dollar that they could keep or “invest …

Wondering when you should hire your first marketing director as a startup? Here is some guidance.
When should startups hire their first marketing director? – BusinessZone (blog) Similarly, The Great Escape Game took on its first marketing hire, Aaron Giles, within a month of opening. Two years later, the real-life themed puzzle game is about to open a third site, having grown to a team of thirty staff and had over 80,000 …

Journalism news . . .

How journalism is taking a close look at the basics in this digital, fake truth age.
Amid digital turmoil, journalism goes back to school – Toronto Star But while methods differ, researchers and journalists can be seen as two sides of the same coin — each working to establish and publish truths and facts. When they work together, the resulting journalism benefits from academic rigour, and the academic …

Films focusing on how journalists work hard to uncover facts are now available from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
Truth campaigns: Major media play up journalism bona fides in brand pushes – PRWeek Both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal have created short films illustrating the lengths that their journalists go to provide accurate reporting and commentary. The London-based Financial Times has also launched an integrated campaign …

The lifecycles of journalism are normal, but will it survive?
Journalism is ‘going through a wildfire’, but what will survive? – Journalism.co.uk “Journalism is not dead, it is going through a life cycle change,” Joyella said, comparing the current state of the media industry and news organisations’ reactions to it to a “wildfire”. “We panic when there are wildfires in the West,” he explained …

 PR Communications news

Digiday takes a look at the internal wrangling at United, as its PR crisis continues.
‘A lot of internal churning’: Inside United’s PR crisis cleanup – Digiday After the company became embroiled in a scandal for forcibly removing a 69-year-old doctor from an overbooked flight earlier this month, it initially issued a tone-deaf response that blamed the passenger for being “disruptive and belligerent.” What …

Why PR should take a close look at how it needs to support the media in its fight against fake news.
PR should be the (not fake) media’s biggest ally in the era of alternative facts – PRWeek Our own profession, public relations, has had several labels over the years. Edward Bernays, the father of PR, first labeled it as the “engineering of consent.” Other labels haven’t been as generous. We’ve been called “flacks” by our kissin’ cousins in …

Learning from the big guns. PR lessons form GE.
Four Corporate Communications Best Practices To Learn From GE – Forbes GE has made significant organizational changes over the past year: The company announced it would move its global headquarters to Boston, it redesigned its performance development and review process, and CEO Jeff Immelt and other executive leaders …

 

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup May 6, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-may-6-20171035-2/feed/ 0
Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup April 27, 2017 http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-27-2017/ http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-27-2017/#respond Thu, 27 Apr 2017 17:17:39 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1002 Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . . Marketing news In an age when digital marketing claims to offer more precision than ever, The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) has released research showing marketing is […]

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup April 27, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . .

Marketing news

In an age when digital marketing claims to offer more precision than ever, The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) has released research showing marketing is poorly targeted.
Irrelevant marketing hits 50% of public – Enterprise Times According to Chris Daly, Chief Executive of the Chartered Institute of Marketing: “What’s most worrying about these results is that they are unsurprising. In our interconnected, ‘always on’ world, being bombarded with irrelevant materials has become …City A.M.

Consumers are being tracked and surveilled by marketers in what one professor calls a post-privacy age. And we allow it because we have come to accept and expect it.
Studying Digital Marketing in a Post-Privacy Era – Penn Current Joseph Turow, the Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication at Penn’s Annenberg School for Communication, is a longtime observer of these advertising and marketing industry practices and one of the leading experts in the field. His research …

Thanks to AI, marketers are making our experiences as consumers more seamless than ever.
How AI is bound to change B2B sales and marketing forever – Econsultancy (blog) B2B marketing and sales departments that will become early adopters of AI are bound to see amazing results very quickly. But in order to get started and to build a strong business case for this type of technology within your organisation, it is …

Journalism news

Is Blendle journalism’s version of Spotify, Netflix? Can it save an industry in crisis?
https://www.poynter.org/2017/blendle-the-dutch-itunes-for-news-lands-investment-from-financial-times-owner-nikkei/453341/
Blendle, the Dutch “iTunes for news,” has landed new investments from Financial Times owner Nikkei and Amsterdam-based investment fund INKEF Capital a year after its debut in the United States.

Using powerful algorithms to unveil relevant and useful information hidden in archives, INJECT helps journalists to find new angles for stories, and to investigate further and deeper into the background of the stories they are working on.
INJECT is a digital toolkit designed to enhance journalistic creativity and improve workflows in busy newsrooms – City, University of London (press release) INJECT was made for busy journalists who are increasingly under pressure to deliver more content with less resources. Using powerful algorithms to unveil relevant and useful information hidden in archives, INJECT helps journalists to find new angles …

President Trump proposed defunding the U.S. Institute for Peace that funds peace journalism, it is important to remember that peace journalism helps stop violence while creating strong communities and must be funded.
We Must Save Peace Journalism – MediaFile In their acclaimed 2005 book, Peace Journalism, Jake Lynch and Annabel McGoldrick provide a concrete definition of peace journalism, writing, “Peace Journalism is when editors and reporters make choices – of what to report and how to report it – that …

PR Communications news

It should come as no surprise – this form of influencer marketing is the main one when it comes to finding a PR agency.
Word of Mouth Primary Resource for Finding PR & Communications Agencies – Cited By 76% of Respondents in New … – PR Newswire (press release) … clients, keywords and more. CommunicationsMatch, our Insights Blog and social media channels are a source of insight and curated best practices for corporate communications and marketing professionals, as well as leadership at start-ups and SMEs.

Among other things, the United Airlines crisis is a reminder that PR crises can be very costly!
Managing costly PR mistakes – Inquirer.net The recent United Airlines wrongdoing of dragging out a seated passenger to accommodate airline employees should serve as a warning that a PR crisis can be very costly. Per industry reports, on the day of the passenger-removal controversy, the shares …

Want to move ahead and be successful in PR? Here are five tips.
You can write, right? Five tips for future PR practitioners – PRWeek Five tips for future PR practitioners. Added 7 hours ago by Edward Clark , Be the first to comment. There’s a ‘national day’ for almost everything, and 10 April didn’t disappoint, offering a celebration for siblings, cinnamon crescents and farmyard …

 

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup April 27, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-27-2017/feed/ 0
How one journalist’s passion turned him into an accidental entrepreneur http://communicateinfluence.com/how-one-journalists-passion-turned-him-into-an-accidental-entrepreneur/ http://communicateinfluence.com/how-one-journalists-passion-turned-him-into-an-accidental-entrepreneur/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:54:24 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=1004 Last week, we profiled Trint, a revolutionary new way of converting audio-video to text. The company was co-founded by Emmy-award winning journalist Jeff Kofman. But when Jeff became CEO of Trint, he had absolutely no experience of running a company, sourcing finance, or hiring or managing people. He’s been on a steep and amazing learning […]

The post How one journalist’s passion turned him into an accidental entrepreneur appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Last week, we profiled Trint, a revolutionary new way of converting audio-video to text. The company was co-founded by Emmy-award winning journalist Jeff Kofman. But when Jeff became CEO of Trint, he had absolutely no experience of running a company, sourcing finance, or hiring or managing people.

He’s been on a steep and amazing learning curve. This week, we catch up with Jeff and talk to him about his journey, what he’s learned, and what advice he has for other brand new entrepreneurs.

Accidental entrepreneur

Jeff, when you started out in journalism, did you plan to become eventually become an entrepreneur?
I did not plan to be an entrepreneur. I call myself the accidental entrepreneur.

If you had told me 10 years ago that I was going to be doing this I would have said you don’t know me. Not a chance.

But that’s one of the really fun things about life. It surprises you in really great ways.

This is such an interesting challenge after 30 years of journalism to be inventing something for journalists and for many others that solves a big problem in the digital age. I’m working with such a smart team and a team of brilliant developers; it is just such a thrill and it is such hard work.  You know it’s very humbling how hard it is.

Was the idea for Trint like a light bulb moment? How did it happen, and where were you at in your life at that time?
I had already accepted a buyout from ABC News and I knew I was going to leave. I was teaching university courses on media studies.

A friend said: “Well if you’re teaching that you should really come with me to Mozfest and see where the cutting edge of media innovation is.” It’s one of the biggest annual conference of media coders in the world.

The friend introduced me to this team of guys who had done a prototype of a product that involved text alignment with audio. It made it searchable and you could manipulate it. They were unbelievably smart. That was the prototype and it hadn’t been turned into a product yet, and they didn’t at that point have a strategy for doing that.

I remember saying it’s an interesting idea and we should try to develop it.

I was just so passionate I just thought: “Wow! This is the future. Either we figure out a way to do this together or we’re all going to go our separate ways never see each other again”.

I imagined us sitting in a cafe five years from now and seeing someone on the laptop doing what we envisioned and saying: “Oh yeah, I remember talking about that back a few years ago and we didn’t do it.” And I didn’t want to be that guy.

And so we got together and started building in December 2014. We got some seed money to just to get out of the gate. And it proved to be more difficult than we expected to actually make it work or make it easy for users. But that’s pretty common when you’re inventing something new.

But even in the early stages some of our early testers at CTV and National Public Radio gave us enough positive feedback that we felt that what we were doing was worth pursuing.

It took us over a year to get it to work at a level that we thought was respectable and usable. And then it took us longer to sort of build out the product around the website and all those things that I’ve now learned you have to do.

That sounds pretty intense. What kind of hours are you putting in these days?
It’s overwhelming how many hours I work. Today I was up at 6:30 a.m. for a call with an investor from Tokyo who is looking at putting some money in to us. Then I was talking to investors from Dubai and another investor in Connecticut.

Later, I was talking to a conference organizer and then to a corporate broadcasting fund that’s looking at investing in us. And then I was just talking in Silicon Valley to a company that we’re looking to doing some collaboration with. Also, I spoke to a candidate for our new developer role. That’s sort of my typical day. It’s really, really busy!

Make decisions quickly and live with the consequences

Which skills from your training and years in journalism have been helpful for you in your role as an entrepreneur and leader of a startup? 

Being a war correspondent is really good training for being a startup entrepreneur because you can’t panic when you’re in a war zone.

You’ve got to just stay calm when things go bad. And I sort of joke that when you run a startup every morning you wake up and wonder what landmines you will discover in your path that you’ll have to navigate around.

It pretty much just like that. There are constant challenges and issues. It doesn’t matter how good or smart you are, you’re always going to face those technical problems, human resources problems, banking problems, or logistical problems.

One of the things that I learned as a foreign correspondent going to very difficult places under deadlines was how to make decisions quickly and live with the consequences.

Sometimes you just have to say we’re going to turn left, and you don’t really know if the right turn would have been a better road. But you still have to hit a deadline and you just do it.

And I’m fortunate I absolutely reach out for people’s wisdom and talk to our team about things.

But ultimately I’m a real believer in making decisions fast and living with the consequence because in a fast-moving company like this indecision is often worse.

The other thing is that nobody survives in journalism if she or he doesn’t isn’t prepared to admit what she or he doesn’t know. Anybody who fakes it in journalism is going to get caught out.

And I think it’s a really important early lesson in life. For example, I still find Excel spreadsheets really intimidating. I know that so I have a terrifically smart business and chief revenue officer who’s who’s really good at Excel. He’s done phenomenal analytics and I just look at them every day and think Jason’s part of this team because I could never have known how to do this.

So you have to admit what you don’t know and surround yourself with people who are smarter than you and know things that you don’t. But I think that it becomes intuitive for journalists to just ask questions and seek answers.

Learning to manage

How hard has it been identifying the right people to work for Trint?
It’s really challenging as a first-time manager-CEO to run a company. A lot of investors steer clear of first time entrepreneurs and I can understand why. You make a lot of mistakes and you learn.

My approach is to employ my journalism skills which is to ask questions and to be honest about what I don’t know. That has served me really well by finding smart people to turn to for advice in terms of hiring.

Very early on I realized that you’re hiring two things: skill set and attitude. This team is not only very skilled but it shares a passion for the product. I’m just not interested in hiring someone who is embarrassed about being excited. Or embarrassed by enthusiasm. I want people whose eyes sparkle when they talk about where it’s going to go and where it’s taking them.

The right attitude in a small company culture is really critical.

What about learning and developing management skills?
You make mistakes. I’ve made lots of mistakes but I’ve learned. We are sponsored in London by Cisco and UCL (University College London), which  is one of the leading computer science universities in the world.

Early on I felt I needed to learn some management leadership skills and UCL offered to put me on a course. I learned so much; it was really great to learn a vocabulary of management and leadership skills and understand how to know when to step in and when to step back. That course really changed my approach and whatever mistakes I make today there are fewer of them I think because of what I learned.

Managing people is a constant challenge and I think a manager and leader’s role is to help people get the best out of themselves. It’s not to do the job for them, it’s to help them do their job and to help position them so that they feel a sense of pride and ownership in the work they’re doing.

Advice for journalists who want to start their own businesses

What advice do you have for the journalists who have a great business idea and want to take it to market?
One of the things about being a startup entrepreneur is that everybody has a brilliant idea.

Ideas are easy. It’s the execution that’s hard. It’s the product market fit (a term that I’ve never heard of before) that matters.

You need to ask: Is this really an idea that the world will want and will pay for or that you can actually find a way to financially support? Because a lot of ideas maybe are good ideas but they’re not financially viable.

Unless you’re going to run a charity you’ve got to be able to actually make a business case for your idea and you’ve got to actually believe that your business case is real.

You have to be very harsh on yourself, ask some hard questions, and give yourself a reality check. You need to know your idea is a product or a concept that the world needs, wants, and will pay for; because you’re going to be running a business.

Some journalists think that ‘business’ is a dirty word. Get over it. Journalism is a business and business creates jobs. Trint has created jobs. That’s what our economy is run on.

It’s so easy to say I’ve got an idea. It’s not so easy to validate the idea and prove that you’ve actually got an idea that the world needs, wants and will pay for.

Support Communicate Influence!

Enjoy this interview, or find it informative and inspiring? Want to read more? Consider donating to Communicate Influence. In return, you receive more in-dpeth interviews, a great feeling for contributing, and, not least, our heartfelt thanks.




© Communicate Influence. Please see Communicate Influence’s Terms and Conditions for information on sharing, adapting or attributing content.

The post How one journalist’s passion turned him into an accidental entrepreneur appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/how-one-journalists-passion-turned-him-into-an-accidental-entrepreneur/feed/ 0
Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup, April 21, 2017 http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-21-2017/ http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-21-2017/#respond Fri, 21 Apr 2017 17:48:55 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=967 Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . . Marketing news How can marketers be more innovative when currently they use it to make only small modifications? Colin Lewis of OpenJaw Technologies has some suggestions. […]

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup, April 21, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . .

Marketing news

How can marketers be more innovative when currently they use it to make only small modifications? Colin Lewis of OpenJaw Technologies has some suggestions.
Colin Lewis: Innovation is the key test of marketers’ competence – Marketing Week Coming up with new ideas is a now a core resposibility for marketers, but most only use it to make small changes to existing products. OpenJaw Technologies CMO Colin Lewis explains how to take practical steps to embed new innovation methods into your …

The flexibility of affiliate marketing is enabling brands to engage with a network of global influencers who are looking to promote their products worldwideHow affiliate marketing is helping brands go global – Marketing Week Affiliate represents its natural digital marketing bedfellow. With a 25-year focus on honing a transparent, return-on-investment-focused and performance-based payment model, it finds itself in the slipstream of current thinking on how brands want to …

In North America and Europe, marketers are embracing automation. But in Japan, just 28% of marketers in Japan who are aware of marketing automation say their employers use the technology. However, this is set to change soon.
Marketers in Japan Slow to Adopt Marketing Automation – eMarketer Just 28% of marketers in Japan who are aware of marketing automation say their employers use the technology, according to a February 2017 JustSystems survey. However, nearly as many say that while their company currently does not use marketing …

Journalism news

Almost anyone can use the worldwide web to be a media outlet, so how will we differentiate between truth, myth and lies?
Journalism faces a crisis worldwide – we might be entering a new dark age – The Guardian Australia’s two largest legacy media organisations recently announced big cuts to their journalistic staff. Many editorial positions, perhaps up to 120, will disappear at Fairfax Media, publisher of The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald, and News …

The passage of traditional journalism from print to digital has been tough. And it’s not been helped by the spread of new media dealing in alternative facts designed to accomplish specific ideological objectives, including framing traditional journalists as enemies of the people.  But, as far as Davis Merritt is concerned, real journalism isn’t going anywhere in the near future.
Real journalism isn’t going away – Wichita Eagle (blog) Newspapers were the primary source of the shared information necessary to help people answer democracy’s core question: What shall we do? The journalism that newspapers traditionally provide and self-government are fully interdependent; one cannot …Co

Communications/PR news

Adidas’ insensitive message caused a real PR nightmare. How could something like this happen?
Adidas Is Latest Major Brand to Have a Serious PR Nightmare – TheStreet.com The list of companies hit recently with a public relations disaster just tacked on one more name – Adidas AG (ADDYY) . Possibly upset from seeing its athletes lose to Nike’s (NKE) in the 121st Boston Marathon foot race on Monday, Adidas sent out a …

Unpaid internships offer real value to some, but they don’t always work out.
Unpaid internships: They’re not for everyone – PRWeek If we accept that internships can prepare a student for real-life work situations — not to mention introduce a student to key contacts — and make him or her a competitive hire in PR and communications, the question we must ask is: how do we make them …

And one from history this week – how PR shapes major political decision which can have massive ramifications.
The Secret PR Push That Shaped the Atomic Bomb’s Origin Story – The Atlantic In August 1945, a few days after the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the government released an official report on the history of the destructive weapon. “The work on the atomic bomb,” it explained, was undertaken in Los …

 

 

 

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup, April 21, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-21-2017/feed/ 0
Journalist entrepreneur revolutionizes transcription process http://communicateinfluence.com/journalist-entrepreneur-revolutionizes-transcription-process/ http://communicateinfluence.com/journalist-entrepreneur-revolutionizes-transcription-process/#respond Wed, 19 Apr 2017 04:26:23 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=971 Technology has impacted many aspects of journalism, but one thing that’s still stuck in the 1970s is how journalists get the content out of a recording. For decades, any journalist who’s recorded an interview has had to hit play, stop, and then type, and then go back and hit play and stop and then type […]

The post Journalist entrepreneur revolutionizes transcription process appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Jeff Kofman
Jeff Kofman working as a journalist in Libya in 2011. Today, he is CEO of Trint

Technology has impacted many aspects of journalism, but one thing that’s still stuck in the 1970s is how journalists get the content out of a recording.

For decades, any journalist who’s recorded an interview has had to hit play, stop, and then type, and then go back and hit play and stop and then type away. Journalists can’t get a lot done until they have found that quote or sound bite that’s just right and captures the essence of a story.

Jeff Kofman, an Emmy award-winning journalist and foreign correspondent, is solving this problem.

In late 2014, Jeff left his illustrious career as a broadcast journalist to begin working full-time on developing a high-tech solution to transcription. Today, Jeff is CEO and co-founder of Trint, a start-up which offers an audio and video-to-text transcription service that condenses a journalist’s workflow significantly.

Trint glues audio & video seamlessly to an automated transcript.

Launched in September, 2016, Trint can also be used by anyone who wants an audio and video-to-text transcription service, such as academics, lawyers, students, podcast producers, and more.

Trint’s key innovation is its machine learning-powered editor, which stitches together the text to the audio, making it incredibly simple to search, verify, and, if necessary, correct. It’s all untouched by human hands. And it’s a truly disruptive technology that’s already been adopted by NPR, Thompson Reuters, ESPN, and other organizations, including universities and publishers.

It transcribes in 13 languages, including English, and in three English accents: North American, Australian, and British.

Based in London, Jeff took time out of his incredibly busy schedule to have video session with Sheelagh Caygill. The session was then Trinted for publication here.

Next week, we’ll talk to Jeff about his transition from journalist to entrepreneur.

Audio and video transformed seamlessly to an automated transcript

Jeff, many readers outside the world of journalism (or transcription) may not understand the significance of Trint and the breakthrough it heralds. Can you put this into perspective for readers and explain how Trint resolves the challenge?
We live in a digital age and that means that most of the communication we exchange is in the form of recorded talk, whether it’s audio or video. At least 80 percent of the Internet’s content is recorded talk in some form. But the problem is that it’s not searchable.

So let’s take an example. Suppose you listen online to a speech about climate change in the Arctic. Then the speaker talks about how polar bears are losing their habitat. For someone interested in only the polar bear points, there is no way to find the spoken reference to polar bears. Instead, the listener has to go through it for the whole hour, or someone has to transcribe it.

That’s what is called dark data. Dark data means that there is a recording out there with content on it that nobody can access. It’s like it is off limits.

What Trint does is it shines a light on dark data. You can take that hour-long recording and Trint it, and suddenly it is searchable on Google.

I can then put the words “polar bear” in the search bar and I can find it. I can see three references, I can browse through them, and find the one I want. And because the text and the audio and the video are all glued together, I can hit play and listen to the speaker and I can hear how she or he has said it and instantly I’ve accessed it.

So from what you have described, Trint is clearly a service that will appeal not only to journalists, but many others, too.
Yes, that problematic scenario that I just described applies to so many people, not just journalists. It has become a part of the way we live today because the problem is that the technology’s gotten ahead of our ability to access the content it creates. Trint is our contribution to trying to help people catch up.

So Trint truly is revolutionary and a significant time saver.

In fact, so that people can understand how much transcription is a headache for journalists, part of Trint’s marketing swag is little candies that look like Tylenol or aspirin, and we call them Transcription relief.

A need to search audio and video recordings

Clearly the hours you had to spend transcribing as a broadcast journalist inspired you. Where else is your passion coming from?
You have to think big and have a passion and a vision to do this and I believe that we’re creating a new language.

The world needs a way to search audio and video recordings and find the content and validate that it that it’s correct and share it . . . get it out there through journalism, social media or through colleagues or corporate partners whatever your needs.

We need to be able to access the content of recorded talk. And Trint is creating an incredibly intuitive language. And what’s critical is to understand that automated speech recognition has made huge strides.

We’ve all seen how good Siri is. When it was first introduced it was kind of a joke. Now it’s really good. Even so, being really good is not the same as being correct and trustworthy. We know that all of these things like Alexa, Siri, and IBM Watson – they make mistakes. And for a journalist, lawyer, business person or academic, those mistakes make it flawed data.

So as good as automated speech recognition has become, its errors disqualified it. Because for any journalist, we can’t use that until we know we can validate it.

And there’s no easy way to do that. You’ve got to go back to the reporting, find the moment, listen to it. We might as well just do it all without automated speech because it takes a long time to find  what we want.

Trint bridges that gap because we marry the text to the original audio or video. When you play the recording in your browser, you can follow the transcript and correct any errors directly in the browser copy.

How will Trint work with people whose first language is English but who have a heavy regional accent?
That’s actually a really smart question. It works really well and if you look at Trustpilot or our Twitter feed, you will see we get a ton of love.

But the truth is we also get people who think that Trint doesn’t work.  They can be quite belligerent in their letters to us, saying you know this product isn’t what it claims to be on the box.

There are only two reasons why people would say that. One is they recorded bad audio, which could be from a Skype call, from a noisy coffee shop with music, or from the back of a lecture hall on their iPhone or Android from 100 feet from the speaker. That kind of audio won’t work with machine learning. And that’s an education. But the other is that it is heavy regional accents.

It will work with North American, British and Australian English. But with heavily accented English, you probably won’t be happy with the results. With Scottish and Welsh, we will eventually look at doing those. But they are small markets and we’re a small company, and you have to be quite harsh about where are you going to put your resources at the early stage. For us, it’s a matter of prioritizing our markets. We’ve got to pay our bills.

The Trint Player

How will Trint work with podcasts?
We’re building the Trint Player for launch in summer 2017. It will provide embeddable, searchable audio aligned text video and video. Users will be able to embed the Trint Player on websites, making audio-video content that will be searchable on Google. People will be able to find that content and instantly send it out on Twitter, Facebook, wherever. There will even be a captioning facility too.

With the work that’s been done so far, the feedback you’ve been getting must feel incredibly rewarding.

If through Trint we can contribute a way to make journalism more efficient so that people can focus on content production and creation rather than simply being stenographers, then that’s a pretty great contribution that we as a team and Trint can do.

As you know, the problem is that journalists and many others are all being asked to do more with less, and faster, too. Searching content is the bottleneck. It really hasn’t changed amidst all of the changes in journalism over the last 30 years that I’ve witnessed.

The one part that hasn’t changed is how we get the content out of our recordings. And that means that you can’t get anything done until you find your quote or sound bite or click whatever you want to call it and what Trint does is condense that workflow massively.

It’s really gratifying the kind of e-mails and tweets you see that we’re getting on our Twitter feed, It’s really really fun to see and really rewarding to see people get it.

Journalist, entrepreneur, and CEO Jeff Kofman

Jeff Kofman is an award-winning journalist, and foreign and war correspondent. He’s a veteran reporter with ABC, CBS and CBC News and has worked in Canada, the U.S., Latin America, the Caribbean, and the U.K. He has reported on many of the biggest stories of our time including the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina and the Arab Spring.

In 2011 he won an Emmy for his coverage of the Libyan Revolution and the downfall of Col. Muammar Gadhafi. He has also been recognized with an Edward R. Murrow Award, an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for Excellence in Journalism, and a DuPont Award, and a special Emmy for coverage of the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks.

While with ABC, Jeff reported from around the globe on stories in the U.K. and Europe as well as the Middle East and Africa for World News with Diane Sawyer, Nightline, and Good Morning America. With CBC, he worked on the flagship news show The National with anchor Peter Mansbridge.

Originally from Toronto, Jeff speaks French and Spanish, and has a B.A. in political science and government from Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada. You can find Jeff on Linkedin and on Twitter.

Support Communicate Influence!

Enjoy this interview, or find it informative and inspiring? Want to read more? Consider donating to Communicate Influence. In return, you receive more great interviews, a great feeling for contributing, and, not least, our heartfelt thanks.




© Communicate Influence. Please see Communicate Influence’s Terms and Conditions for information on sharing, adapting or attributing content.

The post Journalist entrepreneur revolutionizes transcription process appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/journalist-entrepreneur-revolutionizes-transcription-process/feed/ 0
Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup April 14, 2017 http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-14-2017/ http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-14-2017/#respond Fri, 14 Apr 2017 18:21:43 +0000 http://communicateinfluence.com/?p=957 Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . . Marketing news Is it possible to really know which marketing channels will work for a campaign? How to Predict the Future Success of Possible Marketing Channels […]

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup April 14, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
Welcome to Communicate Influence’s weekly curated news resource, featuring the latest news and trends in marketing, journalism, PR and communications. This week, we’re diving into into . . .

Marketing news

Is it possible to really know which marketing channels will work for a campaign?
How to Predict the Future Success of Possible Marketing Channels – Forbes We all wish we could see into the future – for our careers, our personal lives, and even our bank accounts. But if you could predict the future, how would it change your business’s marketing strategy? The truth is, there really is no way to tell how …

Why millennials will succeed at marketing? Because they were born as consumers.
Failure and Authenticity: Why Millennials Succeed At Marketing – Entrepreneur Failure and Authenticity: Why Millennials Succeed At Marketing. Millennials seem to have the tightest grasp on which marketing tactics meet these new expectations and are successful with today’s consumers, mainly because they are today’s consumers.

How to find your answers to questions about measuring content marketing.
5 Things We Learned About How Brands Measure Content Marketing – Forbes Data is more ubiquitous than ever in the digital media industry, but at Parse.ly we wondered if data literacy and data access necessarily go hand-in-hand. The best place to find these answers? On the ground. In partnership with Digiday’s CUSTOM studio …

Exactly what was wrong with Pepsi’s ad? The Huff Post explores.
Influencer Marketing Gone Wrong: Why Pepsi’s Ad Featuring Kendall Jenner Missed The Mark – Huffington Post Influencer marketing has become a booming industry in the past five years. What was once reserved for professional athletes and pop stars has now grown into a wildly popular way for big (and small) brands to converse with new audiences through the …Patheos (blog)TwitterPepsiCo – –

Journalism news

A much-needed investment in journalism by eBay’s founder.
Omidyar network gives $100 million to boost journalism and fight hate speech – Washington Post The philanthropy established by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar will contribute $100 million to support investigative journalism, fight misinformation and counteract hate speech around the world. One of the first contributions, $4.5 million, will go to the …CNNMoneyForbesThe Independent – –

An important development in the fight against fake news, as a new guide is published.
New guide to fake news aims to help the public understand how … – Journalism.co.uk A new guide that aims to enrich public debate around fake news and misinformation was launched at the International Journalism Festival in Italy yesterday (7 …

What has happened to research in journalism (and does anyone care)?
Does anyone care about journalism research? (No, really) – Poynter (blog) It’s become a tired and frustrating refrain from the Twitterati engaged in news innovation: Academic journalism research can’t be shown to have any kind of impact on the professional field, few journalists can even name a journalism researcher and the …

PR/communications news

No PR pro can afford to miss the vital lessons in the United Airlines disaster as a passenger was dragged of a plane.
PR lessons from Al Golin and United Flight 3411 – PRWeek It started on a very sad note on Saturday with the passing of Al Golin, a PR legend and an inspiration to so many people – someone I had the honor to meet on a number of occasions and very glad I was to have done so too. The pace ramped up Sunday with …MarketWatchNDTVChannel NewsAsia – – –

Trolls are a nasty business. If you are in PR, it’s time to know how to deal with them.
How to deal with trolls must be in a PR communicator’s tool kit – Business Mirror They are the intimidators who malign an online conversation with ghastly, naughty or off-putting comments or who spitefully attack our online community, personality, brand or company. They are PR professionals’ nightmares, too, particularly if their …

Was Pepsi’s ad with Kendall Jenner without PR counsel? If so, why?
PR Council: Where was the PR counsel at Pepsi? – PRWeek NEW YORK: The PR Council has criticized Pepsi’s withdrawn ad featuring Kendall Jenner, saying in a statement that counsel from communications professionals would have been “critical” to the soft-drink maker understanding its audience. “Through this ad …

 

The post Marketing, journalism, PR news roundup April 14, 2017 appeared first on Communicate Influence.

]]>
http://communicateinfluence.com/marketing-journalism-pr-news-roundup-april-14-2017/feed/ 0